6 Energy Efficient Ways to Beat the Heat this Summer

beat the heat

Air conditioning may ensure your comfort during the summer, but running it non-stop during a heat wave will have you cringing when your utility bill arrives in the mail. The good news is that there are several ways you can beat the heat this summer without increasing your energy bills.

Here are some energy efficient ways to beat the heat that’ll pay off immediately.

Use your ceiling fans wisely. During the summer, ceiling fans should rotate counterclockwise to push cool air down, creating a wind chill effect. This allows you to set the thermostat at a higher temperature without sacrificing comfort. Portable fans produce the same effect. Turn them off when you leave the room.

Draw the curtains. During the day, room temperatures can rise by as much as 20 degrees, especially in areas with windows that get direct sunlight. Keep your curtains closed during the summer. Blackout curtains are often the most effective at reducing heat gain.

Switch out your light bulbs. Incandescent light bulbs produce a lot more heat than you might think. They are also considered the least energy efficient. LEDs (light emitting diodes) use only 20-25% of the energy and last up to 25 times longer than the traditional light bulbs they replace. Choose bulbs that are ENERGY STAR certified.

Clean or change you’re A/C filters once a month. Your air conditioner consumes 5-10% more energy if the filter is clogged or dirty. You should change or clean the filter out on your A/C unit once a month.

Avoid using your stove or oven during the day. One of the last things you want to do on a hot day is generate more heat. Wait until sundown to use your stove or oven. Use smaller appliances, such as hot plates, crockpots, pressure cookers, and microwaves during the day. Small appliances have the added benefit of being energy efficient.

Install new insulation. Insulation can help keep your home an average of 20 degrees cooler or warmer year-round. It will also reduce your energy bills. Look for insulation with a high R-value (the insulation’s ability to reduce heat transfer). You can choose between fiberglass, cellulose, and spray foam insulation for this project.

Residential Insulation FAQs

Insulation FAQs

Find immediate answers to your questions with these residential insulation FAQs.

Q: What type of insulation do I need?

A: The type of insulation you need depends on where it will be installed, what R-values are required, and your budget. The U.S. Department of Energy recommends different R-values for different zones. In Arizona, a homeowner can get away with using R30 in their attic, whereas the same home in Minnesota would require R49.

Q: What is loose-fill fiberglass?

A: Loose-fill fiberglass insulation is typically blown into unfinished attics, nonconforming spaces and hard-to-reach areas, as this effectively fills all the nooks and crannies of the framing bay. Loose-fill, also known as blown-in insulation, provides better performance than batts because it is much less likely to leave any gaps.

Q: What is an R-value?

A: “R” stands for resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating power and in turn, your energy savings. As mentioned previously, determining the R-value for your residence depends greatly on where it will be installed, and your budget.

Q: Are there rebates or other incentives available for insulation projects?

A: Yes! Government agencies, utilities, and others offer a variety of tax credits and other incentives to support energy-saving upgrades. You may already be aware, but in Arizona, SRP offers their customers a rebate of 75% of the insulation costs (up to $400). APS offers a rebate up to $250. Federal tax credits may also be available.

Q: Can insulation help increase my home’s property value?

A: Yes! Adding insulation to your attic, per this year’s Cost vs. Value report, can generate a 107.7% return on investment should you ever decide to sell your home. This project may also reduce your heating and cooling costs by up to 30 percent and make you eligible for a federal tax credit.

Q: How can we find an insulation contractor?

A: The best course of action is to contact Banker Insulation. When you call, you will be greeted by a member of our friendly staff who will assist you with your energy efficiency project, and help you investigate and receive any applicable insulation rebates. To better assist you, we have over 18 locations throughout the Southwest.

How to Insulate an Attic

insulate an attic

Heating and cooling, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, accounts for more than half of the energy consumed in an average home. This means that an attic that is not properly insulated could be costing you big bucks as heat rises. Taking steps to prevent this loss is good for the environment, good for you, and good for your wallet. Use the following information to insulate an attic.

How much does it cost to insulate an attic?

According to this year’s Cost vs. Value report, which compares the average cost of 29 popular home improvement projects with the value those projects retain at resale in 99 U.S. markets, hiring a contractor to install insulation in your attic will cost $1,343. On the upside, you will see a 107.7% return on investment (ROI), should you ever decide to sell or refinance your home. In addition, you may qualify to receive a federal tax credit of 10% of the cost, up to $500.

How much material do I need?

That depends. Insulation levels are specified by R-value. R-value is a measure of an insulation material’s ability to resist heat flow. Higher R-values are required in colder areas, whereas, R-38 is the recommended value for temperate and hotter climates. Take a look at ENERGY STAR’s recommended home insulation R-values guidelines for more information. Keep in mind that R-values vary depending on material.

Armed with this information, you will then want to measure the length and width of your attic to determine how many square feet of insulation you’ll need. To complete this job, you may also need other materials, such as silicone caulk, metal flashing, and weatherstripping, as it is important to first seal off any existing air leaks or drafts. Sealing off these leaks will provide benefits for years to come.

Tips for Working in the Attic

  • Have a plan in place. The key to any successful project – especially a project of this magnitude – is adequate planning. Before beginning, gather all necessary tools and supplies, including a flashlight. You’ll also want to ensure the area is well-lit by using a work light.
  • Protect yourself. Insulation can be itchy and irritating to the skin, as well as harmful to the lungs, which is why it’s important to wear the proper gear to protect yourself. We recommend wearing safety googles, work gloves, a face mask, and a lightweight disposable coverall in addition to using knee pads.

3 Steps to an Insulated Attic

Step 1: Seal Air Leaks

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that you or a professional air seal your attic before insulating it. There are many benefits to air sealing including reducing heating and cooling costs, improving durability, increasing comfort, and creating a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two effective air sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment.

Step 2: Choose Your Insulation

Loose Fill Insulation – No one says you have to use the same type of insulation that currently exists in your attic when adding additional material. You can easily use loose fill on top of fiberglass batts or blankets. If you choose to use loose fill insulation, it may be in your best interest to hire a professional as this type of material requires specialized machines and techniques.

Batt Insulation – Laying fiberglass rolls is an easy to moderate do-it-yourself project. Sold in various widths, this type of insulation is designed to fit easily within most typical joists, although layering is required to get the proper R-value for your zone. When laying down additional insulation, work from the perimeter, moving towards the attic opening. Never lay insulation over recessed light fixtures or soffit vents.

Step 3: Create Barriers

No matter the material, if you’re installing insulation near recessed lights or soffit vents, you’ll want to use sheet metal or wire mesh to help create a barrier. Insulation and recessed light fixtures do not mix! Some recessed lights, however, are designed for “insulation contact” or “IC,” in which case no barrier is required. Check the fixture first before installing insulation.

Everything You Need to Know About Attic Insulation

attic insulation

Would you like to save on home energy costs?

By adding attic insulation, you are provided with some of the largest opportunities to save energy in your home, as well as maintain a comfortable temperature throughout much more efficiently. Whether it is summer or winter, adding attic insulation makes your house a lot more livable, while saving you some much needed dough.

In addition, according to Remodeling magazine’s 2016 Cost vs. Value report, adding attic insulation is the #1 home improvement project with the best return on investment (ROI). In fact, attic insulation was the only home improvement project to provide over a 100% return on investment, recouping you 116.9%.

There are also several tax credits you should be aware of. According to ENERGY STAR, typical bulk insulation products like those mentioned below, qualify for a federal tax credit amount of 10% of the cost; up to $500. This tax credit is available for purchases made in 2016, as well as retroactive to purchases made in 2015.

  • Rolls
  • Batts
  • Rigid boards
  • Blow-in fibers
  • Pour-in-place
  • Expanding spray foam

Fiberglass, cellulose, mineral wool, spray foam, foam board, and cotton batting all qualify for the energy tax credit as long as its primary purpose is to a) insulate and b) bring your home up to recommended R-value guidelines. For insulation recommendations tailored to your home, visit the DOE’s Home Energy Saver Tool.

Products that reduce air leaks such as weather stripping, canned spray foam, caulk designed specifically for air sealing, and house wrap also qualifies for these tax credits as long as they come with a Manufacturers Certification Statement. Professional installation costs are NOT included.

Should I Invest in Attic Insulation?

If your home experiences any of the following symptoms, you may want to consider adding adequate levels of insulation to your home’s attic space, along with its interior walls, floors, and crawl spaces. Note that the EPA recommends air sealing the attic using any one of the aforementioned products before adding insulation.

  • Drafty rooms.
  • Hot or cold ceilings or walls.
  • High heating or cooling costs.
  • Uneven temperatures between rooms.
  • Ice dams in the winter (where applicable).

Determining Proper Insulation R-Values

Understanding an insulation material’s R-value – a measure of how well it resists the flow of heat – is very important. The higher the number, the better the insulating power, and the more energy you will save. If your home is not properly insulated – which is often the case in Arizona – the higher your energy bills will be.

Recommended R-values are 30 to 60 for most attic spaces, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, with R-38 (or about 12 to 15 inches, depending on material type) being considered the “sweet spot.” In colder climates like Flagstaff, Prescott or Payson, go for R-49.

Professional Installation by Banker Insulation

As a locally owned and operated insulation contractor, servicing the entire state of Arizona, we take great pride in all aspects of what we do. We specialize in both residential and commercial insulation installs. No job is ever too big or small for us to handle and we happily provide free in-home estimates. Contact us today to learn more.

How to Determine Insulation’s R-Value

insulation's R-value

Understanding the insulation’s R-value – a measure of how well it reduces the flow of heat and cold into and out of your house – is very important. If your home or business is not properly insulated, which is often the case in Arizona, the more expensive your home energy bills. However, you should consider increasing the R-value of insulation for more reasons that just high energy bills, although that alone is a big selling point.

Ensuring the proper R-value of insulation will not only make your home more energy efficient – lowering heating and cooling costs – but, it will also make it more comfortable and healthier for all occupants. As you will see below, of all the insulation types, foam insulation carries the highest R-values per inch. Other benefits of insulation, regardless of type, is sound dampening.

To determine the R-value of insulation in your home, you will first need to know the R-value of your current insulation material, as well as how many inches exist. Insulation often decreases over time due to a number of factors. Depending on where you live in the Grand Canyon State is also of importance. Warmer areas can do with lower R-values (R-30 – R-49) while colder areas, like Flagstaff, require higher levels (R-49 – R-60).

Insulation’s R-Value by Type

The R-values per inch of the most common types of insulation are as follows:

  • Fiberglass (loose): 2.2-2.7
  • Fiberglass (batts): 2.9-3.8
  • Cellulose (loose): 3.2-3.8
  • Rock Wool (loose): 3.0-3.3
  • Foam (sprayed): 3.2-6.5

Installation of Insulation

At Banker Insulation, we value your time, which is why we’re dedicated to ensuring installation is scheduled at time most convenient for you. Typically blown-in insulation projects can be completed in two to four hours depending on location. However, it’s important to note that sprayed-in foam insulation, and more extensive projects can take a bit longer to install. We do not consider a job complete until it’s met with your satisfaction. Contact us today for a free estimate: (602) 273-1261!

*Source: U.S. Department of Energy

The 411 On Fiberglass Insulation

fiberglass insulation

Having fiberglass insulation professionally installed is one of most environmentally friendly, not to mention…valuable, things a homeowner can do. This project offers many benefits, such as, the reduction of heating and cooling costs by approximately 30 percent with proper insulation. And, with the reduction of heating/cooling costs, comes monetary savings for you.

According to Remodeling magazine’s Cost vs. Value report for 2016, the fiberglass attic insulation project (new for this year) produced the top return on cost of any of the 30 projects in this year’s report. If you insulated your attic with fiberglass insulation, which costs an average of $1,268, you can expect to receive 116.9 percent or $1,482 of that back at resale.

Fiberglass Insulation

The most common type of insulation, fiberglass is composed of glass, which is used in a wide variety of applications. As an insulator, fiberglass slows the spread of heat, cold, and sound in homes. By trapping pockets of air, it keep rooms warm in the winter and cool in the summer, thereby reducing a home’s energy consumption by up to 40%.

Fiberglass can be installed in various parts of a home’s envelope. It can be pink, yellow, white or green, depending on the manufacturer. Commonly found in blanket form, called batts, it is available in bags containing standard pre-cut lengths and widths. It is also available in loose fill, which is professionally blown into attics, walls and floor cavities.

Fiberglass insulation is available in a wide variety of thickness. Thicker materials offer a higher resistance to heat flow. This resistance is known as an R-value. Common R-values associated with fiberglass are R11 to R19 for flooring, and R30 to R38 for ceilings and attics. The higher the R-value, the more energy efficient the material will be.

Federal Tax Credits

Planning on staying in your home? A federal energy tax credit can help you recoup a percentage of your insulation investment if you complete the improvements by the end of 2016. A tax credit is actually a dollar-for-dollar reduction in taxes equal to 10 percent of the cost of insulation (up to $500). Tax credits do not include installation costs. Click here for more information.