How to Determine Insulation’s R-Value

insulation's R-value

Understanding the insulation’s R-value – a measure of how well it reduces the flow of heat and cold into and out of your house – is very important. If your home or business is not properly insulated, which is often the case in Arizona, the more expensive your home energy bills. However, you should consider increasing the R-value of insulation for more reasons that just high energy bills, although that alone is a big selling point.

Ensuring the proper R-value of insulation will not only make your home more energy efficient – lowering heating and cooling costs – but, it will also make it more comfortable and healthier for all occupants. As you will see below, of all the insulation types, foam insulation carries the highest R-values per inch. Other benefits of insulation, regardless of type, is sound dampening.

To determine the R-value of insulation in your home, you will first need to know the R-value of your current insulation material, as well as how many inches exist. Insulation often decreases over time due to a number of factors. Depending on where you live in the Grand Canyon State is also of importance. Warmer areas can do with lower R-values (R-30 – R-49) while colder areas, like Flagstaff, require higher levels (R-49 – R-60).

Insulation’s R-Value by Type

The R-values per inch of the most common types of insulation are as follows:

  • Fiberglass (loose): 2.2-2.7
  • Fiberglass (batts): 2.9-3.8
  • Cellulose (loose): 3.2-3.8
  • Rock Wool (loose): 3.0-3.3
  • Foam (sprayed): 3.2-6.5

Installation of Insulation

At Banker Insulation, we value your time, which is why we’re dedicated to ensuring installation is scheduled at time most convenient for you. Typically blown-in insulation projects can be completed in two to four hours depending on location. However, it’s important to note that sprayed-in foam insulation, and more extensive projects can take a bit longer to install. We do not consider a job complete until it’s met with your satisfaction. Contact us today for a free estimate: (602) 273-1261!

*Source: U.S. Department of Energy

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