Understanding Heat Transfer

heat transfer

One of the biggest contributors to expensive home energy bills is the heat transfer that occurs as a direct result of insufficient or improper insulation. Heat transfer is the movement of heat from the indoors to outdoors during the winter, and from outdoors to indoors during the summer. Controlling the transfer of heat in and out of your home is an essential first step in reducing your home’s energy use.

Types of Heat Transfer

Heat is transferred to and from an object – in this case: your home – via one of three methods: conduction, radiation, and convection. Understanding how conduction, radiation, and convection work will help you insulate smarter and stop dreading those monthly energy bills. Let’s examine each of these in more detail.

Conduction is the transfer of heat through liquids or gases. On hot days, heat is conducted into your home through the roof, walls, and windows. This results in an increase of energy use. Insulation, energy-efficient windows, and heat-reflecting roofs slow the heat conduction and help maintain a comfortable temperature.

Radiation is the transfer of heat through space in the form of visible and non-visible light. Sunlight is an obvious source of heat for homes. This results in more wear and tear, as well as energy use, on your HVAC system as it attempts to overcome the heat gained. Energy-efficient windows, UV films and screens, and blinds can help block this radiation.

Convection is the third method for heat transfer. Convection affects your home by air infiltration. Convection occurs through all surfaces of the home – walls, floor, roof, windows, and doors. Weatherstripping, caulk, outlet gaskets, and spray foam are key products for ensuring a tight envelope.

Energy Audits

One of the best ways to combat heat transfer is to schedule a comprehensive energy audit, which often includes both a visual inspection and thermal imaging scan. Together these detect cold spots, air leaks and intrusion, energy hogging appliances, and, of course, insufficient amounts of insulation. Consider having an energy audit done if your home is drafty in the winter, and stuffy in the summer, or your energy bills seem excessive.

Ensuring Sufficient Insulation

Ensuring sufficient insulation is important because it resists the flow of heat. Insulation in attic, wall, and floor cavities force the heat to conduct from one insulation fiber to another which slows the passage of heat. Insulation adds to your comfort, increases sound control, creates a healthier home environment, reduces your energy bills, and has a positive impact on the environment.